Dimitry Gerrman

Dimitry Gerrman

b. 1955

Dimitry Gerrman was born in 1955 in Gomel, Belarus. His interest in sculpture at an early age led him to study art throughout his primary schooling, and in 1974 he graduated from the Sculpture Department of the Glebov Art College in Minsk. Furthering his early accomplishments was his first commission: a monumental relief that was dedicated to the Russian Revolution, in Gomel, Belarus. By 1980 his extraordinary talent had been championed by the faculty of the Vera Mukhina Academy of Arts in St. Petersburg, Russia, where he graduated from the Department of Monumental Sculpture in 1985. This support continued during an active schedule of national exhibitions and commissioned projects throughout the Glasnost period. In 1990 Gerrman moved to the United States and continued to develop his artistic endeavors working with smaller galleries and private art dealers. His work received strong interest from major collectors and several institutions, including a commission for the highly regarded Lester Levy Humanitarian Award. In 1994 Gerrman created another sculpture, the Crying Violin, which became the International Elie Wiesel Holocaust Remembrance Award. The inaugural presentation was given for outstanding dedication and service to Steven Spielberg for his movie Schindler’s List. By 1996 Dimitry Gerrman was settled in the American lifestyle and became a member of the prestigious National Sculpture Society. Having found inspiration and comfort from the continuing demand for his editions and newer sculptures, his commissions continued to receive critical acclaim and were endorsed by leading architects around the globe. Many of his newer sculptures, including Circle of Time; 1999, were commissioned for a major interior project at a renowned Beaux-Arts Building in New York, while his sculpture Reflection; 2000 was acquired by The State Russian Museum, St. Petersburg. Both of these astounding works reflect his philosophical point of view in their simplicity and continuity of movement. It is often noted that Gerrman’s Russian cultural heritage combined with his classical training underlie his work. He constantly searches for self-expression in his art by exploring variations of themes and compositions, and by experimenting with plasticity of form and rhythm. Gerrman’s works can be found in numerous museums around the world, including The State Russian Museum in St. Petersburg, which he truly feels is an exalted honor from his native land. We, too, feel honored in representing Dimitry Gerrman on an exclusive basis in America since 2003.

sflwaDimitry Gerrman