Ward Jackson

Ward Jackson

1928 – 2004

Inspired by Piet Mondrian and Josef Albers, Ward Jackson (1928 – 2004) and his hard-edge geometric compositions held a presence in the New York art scene for more than 50 years. His works are in permanent collections of world-class museums and have been included in significant exhibitions. In the early ‘60s Jackson was generating a forceful series of black and white compositions that very much played off a consistent lozenge format – and very boldly relied on the symmetric disposition of forms while going back and forth between rectilinearity and eccentricity. Jackson, who had begun as a landscape painter, returned to color at the end of the decade, generating a series of vibrant, deeply hued paintings throughout the ‘70s that play with flat, often-veil like forms, offbeat arrangements, and, often, a sense of lateral or even forward movement, as if projecting off the canvas.   

Findlay Galleries is dedicated to Jackson’s legacy and to furthering his contribution to the Minimalism movement of the 1960s. Gallery owner James R. Borynack commented, “Jackson’s contribution to hard-edge painting and to Minimalism was profound and lasting. We are honored to represent his estate as we continue our efforts to build on the legacies of important American post-war painters.” — Peter Frank  |  October 2016

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